Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test (NSCST) Kit

Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test (NSCST) Kit is the first practical, nationally-standardized nonverbal Stroop test for cognitive-process and neur...
Item Product Price QTY
30152 Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test (NSCST) Kit $155.00
30152M NSCST Manual $58.00
30152R NSCST Record Forms, Pk/25 $48.00
30152C NSCST Cards, 2 Sets $40.00
30152L NSCST Laminate $25.00
30152D Nonverbal Stroop Training Video $20.00
30152S Nonverbal Stoop Scoring Software $45.00
Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test (NSCST) Kit is the first practical, nationally-standardized nonverbal Stroop test for cognitive-process and neuropsychological assessment, useful for executive functioning assessment with those with language issues

Quick, easy, efficient, and COMPLETELY nonverbal Stroop task!

The first practical, nationally-standardized nonverbal stroop test for cognitive-process and neuropsychological assessment.
Christopher Koch, Ph.D. and Gale Roid, Ph.D.

  • Age Range: 3-75+ years-of-age
  • Time: Approximately 5 minutes

Based on more than 20 years of Stroop-effect research by the author, the Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test (NSCST), published by Stoelting, is a 5-minute test to assess cognitive-interference processes in children and adults, ages 3 to 75+. Nationally standardized on more than 1,000 individuals and co-normed with the Leiter-3, the NSCST uses pantomime, non-vocal test administration methods to identify process deficits in executive functioning and attention processes. The test uses procedures proven effective in many years of computerized Stroop research, adapted for individual assessment.

The test can be used alone or in combination with other Stroop measures (e.g., the Nonverbal Stroop Subtest of the Leiter-3 or Golden’s Color-Word Stroop test) within a cognitive, or neuropsychological, battery of tests. Two sets of cards—one with matching color bars (“color congruent”) and one with non-matching color bars (“color incongruent”)—to contrast the speed (cards per second) with which the individual sorts the cards onto a large laminated sheet showing locations for each color. The difference between the congruent and incongruent trials reveals the degree of Stroop interference, hence the “Stroop Effect.” The effect score can then be converted to a national percentile or standard score for the examinee’s age group to assess the magnitude of any unusually large difference in sorting speed, showing evidence of process deficits.

The NSCST Kit includes two sets of Cards, laminate Sorting Sheet, Stopwatch, 25 Record Forms and Manual. The Manual summarizes the theory and research on Stroop effect, administration and scoring methods, interpretation and case studies, development and standardization, reliability and validity of the instrument.

Nonverbal Stroop Scoring Application

The Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test Scoring Application (Nonverbal Stroop Scoring App) will help clinicians generate scaled scores for raw scores they obtained administering the Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test (Nonverbal Stroop), interpret those scores, and generate reports to communicate results. The Nonverbal Stroop Scoring App helps clinicians by:

  • Quickly and efficiently generating accurate scores
  • Providing language for summarizing test results
  • Providing reports that clearly communicate results
  • Providing a way to store client information that can be later recalled and used to regenerate a report
The Nonverbal Stroop Scoring App is a web-based application.  Purchase of the scoring application allows one individual to have unlimited access to the application.  Upon purchase, users will be emailed an access code to use the application via the Internet.

 

 

Nonverbal Stroop Training Video Sample


Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test Research

Buswell & Koch. (2012). Comparing Verbal and Nonverbal Stroop Tasks: A Synesthesia Case Study. Presented at the Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience Oregon Chapter.

Jasper, L. E. (2016). Working memory and long-term abstinence from substance use (Order No. 10170427). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1827600804).

  • Impact of substance use on memory, as assessed with the Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test

Jasper, L., Koch, C., Lowen, J., Schloemer, J., & Kays, D. (2014). Changes in verbal memory during youth football. Paper presented at the doi:http://dx.doi.org.tcsedsystem.idm.oclc.org/10.1037/e536852014-001

  • Nonverbal Stroop Card Sorting Test's use in evaluating memory due to external factors

Koch, C. (2012). Nonverbal Assessment of Attention. Presentation at National Association of School Psychologists

  • Explanation of the Stroop effect and implications for diagnosis

Koch, C. (2016). Evaluating Equating Methods for a Manual and Computerized Card Sorting Task. Poster session presented at the 46th Annual Meeting of the Society for Computers in Psychology.

  • Review of methods for conversion of scores to allow for contextualization of scores on different tests

Koch, C., & Gentry, R. (2013, November). The Effects of English-Spanish Bilingualism on Assessing Attention. Poster session presented at the 21st Annual Conference on Object Perception, Attention, and Memory, Toronto, CA.

  • Shows need for nonverbal Stroop task due to influence of language on performance

Koch, C., & Luther, K. (2013, November). The Relationship Between Continuous Performance Tasks and Color-Word and Nonverbal Stroop Tasks. Poster session presented at the 21st Annual Conference on Object Perception, Attention, and Memory, Toronto, CA.

  • Different forms of the Stroop task produce a Stroop effect, but the nonverbal form may have unique characteristics

Koch, C. & Roid, G. (2012). A Nonverbal Stroop Task Assessment of Inhibition Among Children with Autism. Presented at National Academy of Neuropsychology.

Sutton, T.M., Altarriba, J., Gianico, J.L. & Basnight-Brown, D.M. (2007). The automatic access of emotion: Emotional Stroop effects in Spanish-English bilingual speakers. Cognition and Emotion, 21(5), 1077-1090.

  • Supports that those highly proficient in bilingualism have similar Stroop effect results as primary language speakers